Commissions

NZ music is at the heart of NZTrio. We are proud to present the hugely varied music of our talented and valuable composing colleagues both locally in NZ and on the international stage.

Below is a list of the composers and works we have commissioned to date (both from NZ and elsewhere in the world), with links through to their programme notes.


Composer - Adams, Chris

Jekyll Rat (written for NZTrio 2010) – 10′

This work was written for the NZTrio while I was the inaugural University of Otago/James Wallace Artist in Residence at the Pah Homestead.

Twinkle twinkle little star
how I wonder what you are?
A little bit hound, a little bit fox,
a junkie for the ballot box?
Twinkle twinkle little star
who’d have thought you’d come this far.

[adapted from Sam Mahon’s A Knight’s Tale]

While Jekyll Rat is based on a prominent New Zealand politician, it unfortunately could be applicable to a number of political figures. It deals with my anger and frustration that a number of local body representatives and nationally elected politicians forget that they were elected to represent their constituents and instead become absorbed by the power and prestige of the position, or use their power and influence for personal gain.

Jekyll Rat has three movements. The first “Me ne frego” (translation: I don’t give a damn), starts with the statement of the principal theme but then over the course of the movement is gradually consumed by an insidiously growing chromatic semiquaver sequence in the strings. The second “Sycophant’s Dance,” moves between sections of slightly awkward and clumsy pomposity, teetering fragility and vicious rage. The final movement “Insanity represented by Mustard Yellow” is fast and frenetic until it finally ends with an almost elegiac reprisal of the principal theme.

Composer - Bailey, Judy

So many rivers (NZTrio Commission, premiered April 2010) – 10′

This work endeavours to portray concepts that are both literal and allegorical in nature. The composition begins as it ends, with a calm, almost meditative state, but in between its curves and meanderings we detect the gradual emergence of almost hidden movement – the subtle shifts of mood, the gathering momentum with hints of playfulness, the growing turbulence, the troubled and sometimes tormented complexity that may eventually find its way through to a flowing serenity, and not to forget the ‘passing nod’ that reflects the historical and cultural influence of the various regions that may be encountered on this journey.

Composer - Body, Jack

Pain in the Arse (NZTrio commission, premiered March 2012) – 8′

Fire in the belly (NZTrio commission, premiered September 2007) – 7′ 

O CAMBODIA (NZTrio commission, premiered March 2011) – 20′

Two Blues: John Lee’s Pluck and Mary Lou’s Dream (arranged for piano trio)

Rainforest II for piano trio

Jangkrik Genggong (piano trio and gamelan)

Nocturne (cello and piano)

 

Pain in the Arse:

A few years ago, the Kronos Quartet told me an amusing story. As they descended in a hotel lift on their way to rehearse a piece of mine, one member of the quartet asked another, ‘Oh, did you remember to bring the Body Parts?’ A startled silence fell on the other passengers in the lift…Well, parts of the body are a rich source of metaphor. Hence the concept for this trio, to which yet more movements will be added as time passes.

First came Fire in the Belly, commissioned by NZTrio in 2007. The new movement, completed in February 2012, is Pain in the Arse, that annoying someone or something that causes us extreme irritation or frustration. But there are also literal meanings: rectal pain caused by a fissure, an abscess, infection, or most commonly, by haemorrhoids… actually, I find the business of composing ‘a bit of a pain’, meaning that it’s hard work! On the other hand, the rewards in the end can make it all worthwhile – such as having my music performed by the dedicated and wonderfully spirited NZTrio!

 

Fire in the Belly:

Fire in the belly is that energy that impels us to do things, make things, and to act with urgency and a sense of necessity. It is one important source of creative energy, and without it art can be flaccid and dull. It is what teenagers tend to have a lot of, and what aged folk like me need to try to recapture from time to time!

The work was commissioned by NZTrio with funding from Creative NZ, “and I was delighted to receive this invitation from an ensemble which has such a fantastic commitment to NZ music.”

 

Composer - Chen, Musheng

Gusu melody capriccio (NZTrio commission, premiered March 2009) – 10′

Musheng Chen was born in the province of Zhejiang in south-east China. Today he is considered one of the most remarkable Chinese composers of his generation.

From 1993 to 1998 he studied at the Shanghai Conservatory, with Chinese masters Chen Ming-zhi (fugue), Yang li-qing (orchestration), and Zhao Xiao-Sheng (composition). A couple of years later, he furthered his composition studies under the tutelage of Eric Gaudibert at the Conservatory of Geneva, as well as attending a master class held by Klaus Huber in Lugano. From 2004 to 2005 he lived in Paris as a composer in residence at the Cité International des Arts.

Since the premiere of his concert-portrait “Ch´an (Suite) ” took place at the Radio DRS2 in January 2002 in Bern, the music of Musheng gained a considerable public audience. His works have been performed at several festivals and concerts throughout Europe and Asia. Future commissions include: a chamber composition by Berlin Philharmonic, a flute concerto for Maestro P-Y Artaud by the French State, a new opera San Qi Ju (libretto by Christopher Park), and an orchestra piece for Shanghai Conservatory Orchestra.

He has received numerous international prizes and awards including: first honorary mention form the Accademia Costantiniana in Roma, first Grand prize of the Concours Dutilleux, first Grand prize form the Academie de Lutèce in Paris,. He’s also winner of the Queen Elizabeth Competition in Belgium, the Amsterdam Nieuw Ensemble Chinese Composer competition, the Young Artiste Award (Geneva), and Patino Foundation. Musheng is a member of the Swiss Musician Association (ASM) and SUISA and is currently teaching at the Shanghai Conservatory of Music.

 

Composer - Clement, Rachel

Shifting states (NZTrio Commission 2005) – 12.5′

sabbia (sand)

filigrana (filigree)

bullicante (with bubbles)

millefiore (thousand flowers)

sommerso (submerged)

This set of short pieces is inspired by an interest in mid-Twentieth Century glassmaking, in which the process of changing state, or changing phase, is essential to the production of the many types of art glass. Each piece is titled with the name of a different technique and express some of the processes of freezing, melting, vaporization, condensation and sublimation.

Shifting states was commissioned by NZTrio with funding from Creative New Zealand.

Composer - Cowan, Claire

Ultraviolet (CMNZ commission for NZTrio) – 8′

Subtle Dances (NZTrio/CMNZ Co-commission) – 10′

wood : strings : hammers : flesh – 10′

Claire Cowan is a composer and performer based in Auckland. She studied composition at Auckland University and since graduating with Honours in 2006, has pursued a career in music for concert, film and theatre. Claire is an experienced orchestrator and symphonic writer, having worked with many of New Zealand’s leading orchestras. Cowan has collaborated on scores for Red leap theatre, the Auckland Theatre Company, Touch Compass, and Thread Theatre’s debut production of ‘The Keepers’ which was nominated for a Chapman Trip award for best original music. Her TV Scoring credits include “Waitangi”, “Billy” and “The Women’s Vote.” In 2015 Claire completed a 6 part mini-series score “Hillary” for TVNZ. As an orchestral arranger she has worked with many of NZ’s leading pop talent including Julia Deans, Anna Coddington, Anika Moa, Dave Dobbyn, The Modern Maori Quartet, Tama Waipara, The Adults, Jon Toogood and Bic Runga. Her own performance project, ‘The Blackbird Ensemble’ (25 piece orchestra) have performed to sold out crowds in since it’s inception in 2010, covering rarely performed classical and popular music by living composers.

 

Ultra Violet:

Claire writes: “I learned that the mantis shrimp (which is the most lusciously hued crustaecean in the world) can see more colours than any creature on earth. Ultra Violet vision (at one far end of the colour spectrum) is only known to a few humans on Earth. But many birds and insects possess this quality.  It is innate to their survival and navigation systems. This piece explores my continued fascination with the seemingly simple yet endlessly complex, through the growth and development of a single musical statement. What does it need to survive? How must it adapt to move forward? How will it change colour and mood with the simple addition of a non-related pitch? I think of myself as a bird, navigating through a musical landscape guided by intuition, and on a journey to create and discover colours beyond the edges of our visible spectrum.”

 

Subtle Dances:

Subtle Dances

Be Slow and Lie Low

Nerve Lines  

Claire writes: “Subtle Dances is a set of three short moods for Piano Trio. Each work features one instrument more prominently: firstly cello; then piano; then violin. The music explores my ongoing fascination with the creation of space within music. Hypnotic and meditative, the pieces present themselves as a contrasting set of interior landscapes –– passing thoughts, memories, unsolvable problems, and explorations of headspace.

It begins with a dance: a rhythmical and passionate interlocking of playful lines, but not without an element of danger and risk. Next, an elegy: the body in its slowest state. Finally, struggle: an unanswered question, a cycle, and ultimately, transition –bursting through into a new light.”

 

Composer - Cree Brown, Chris

Gallipoli Fragments for Piano Trio, Fixed Media and Images (Commissioned by NZTrio 2015) – 27′

The Triumvirate (commissioned by NZTrio in 2005) – 4′

Gallipoli Fragments for Piano Trio (Fixed Media and Images):

Introduction and Enlist – The Landing – The Turkish Attack – Abide With Me – The Maori Contingent – The Nek – Çanakkale – Ataturk’s words and Ending   

This incredible work brings Gallipoli directly to the theatre of the modern day. Chris has quite some experience there: he made his first visit in 1994, and was the driving force behind the trio’s visit to the 2012 Asian Composers Festival in Izmir. In the meantime, he took an entire sabbatical year to work on his Pilgrimage to Gallipoli, and this new work, in eight continuous sections, fuses elements of that recorded sound with stunning images from both sides and new acoustic music for the trio – sometimes in distinct melodies, sometimes more abstract, always in a variety of textures to allow the media to come through. He describes his first experience there:   

“From Istanbul, it’s a six-hour bus journey to Çanakkalle, the major town near the battlefield, and the name by which the Turks refer to the war. Amid the cacophony of ticket sellers at the Istanbul Bus Station were other, more familiar accents… and this was the start of an extraordinary journey. Landmarks such as Çanak Bair, the Nek, Walker’s Ridge, Baby 700, Courtney’s Post and Shrapnel Valley became real places for me… and despite the peaceful calm of the present-day battlefields set against the glittering Aegean Sea, it was not too difficult to imagine the miserable conditions under which the youthful soldiers fought so courageously. The horrific relics in the museum, the endless discussions on various aspects of the campaign, and particularly the services and ceremonies were powerful and emotional experiences – experiences I will never forget… a glimpse of the true horror and tragedy of those nine months back in 1915 sank in….”  

‘God Save the King’ and the National anthems of Austria and Serbia illustrate the Introduction and Enlist, with recruitment posters and the shooting of the Archduke leading quickly into The Landing, 25 April, 1915. On 19 May comes The Turkish Attack, a massive force of 40,000 that was trying to push the Anzacs back out to sea, with searing imagery that also shows the humanity and growing respect between the two sides. The piano starts in on the hymn ‘Abide With Me‘ while the strings play the popular tune ‘There is a Rose in No Man’s Land’, all intertwined with the Muslim Call to Prayer. The pictures take centre-stage in The Maori Contingent, which leads in Advance Australia Fair to focus on the Australians’ attack at the Nek. The recruitment posters return in a more gruesome, ironical setting. The drama and violence is undercut by a simple Turkish folk song in Çanakkale, unbearably poignant: and finally, the Turkish national anthem heralds Ataturk’s words and Ending, with media and trio combined, and the words that Ataturk addressed to the first visitors to Gallipoli, April 25, 1934.  

Çanakkale  

In Çanakkale stands the Mirror Bazaar.

Mother I set forth against the enemy, oh, my youth, alas!

In Çanakkale there’s a cypress tree.

Some of us are engaged, some of us married, oh, my youth, alas!

In Çanakkale there’s a broken jug.

Mothers and fathers abandoned hope, oh, my youth, alas!

Çanakkale’s heights are shrouded with smoke.

The thirteenth division marched to war, oh, my youth, alas!

In Çanakkale the cannonballs landed.

Ah, our comrades fell wounded together, oh, my youth, alas!

Çanakkale’s bridge is narrow, impassable.

Its waters have become red blood, not a cup can be drunk, oh, my youth, alas.

From Çanakkale I barely escaped

My lungs rotted from vomiting blood, oh, my youth, alas!

From Çanakkale I escaped, my head is safe

Doomsday came before I reached Anafarta, oh my youth, alas

In Çanakkale they shot me.

They buried me before I died, oh, my youth, alas!

In Çanakkale are rows of willows

Brave lions rest beneath them, oh, my youth, alas.

Please note: This work commemorates New Zealand’s involvement in Gallipoli and contains photographic images of war time which may disturb some people.

Special thanks to John Chrisstoffels who edited the images. Sources: Alamy Archives New Zealand Australian War Museum Auckland Museum National Army Museum National Library of New Zealand Puki Ariki Ben Talman

 

The Triumvirate:

The Triumvirate was commissioned by NZTrio in 2005. The commission called for something short, energetic and dynamic. When writing the initial sketches for the work, it occurred to me that the musical phrases seemed to imitate the shape of vocal inflections that might occur when three people were having a heated discussion – the same sort of heated argument that might ensue when three strong personalities were given equal authority over the same area of responsibility. I built upon this concept when writing the work, and settled on a title that might reflect a situation when such a quarrel could possibly arise.

Composer - Cresswell, Lyell

Moto Perpetuo (NZTrio Commission 2006) – 6′

Moto Perpetuo – perpetual motion – motion that, once started, will go on for ever unless stopped by other forces or worn out. The music ebbs and flows around a lively speed of MM120 (i.e. 2 beats per second). It fluctuates only slightly between MM138 (2.3 beats per second) and MM104 (1.7 beats per second).

Moto Perpetuo was commissioned by NZTrio, with funding by Creative New Zealand.

Composer - Dadson, Phil

Firestarters [zones of darkness and unexpected light] (NZTrio commission, premiered September 2008) – 25′

There is an improvisatory impulse at the root of the work that involves the performers embracing and engaging with a process, a language, a degree of risk, and the ability to fly.

The success of the ‘firestarters’ hinges precariously on just this, and for me that’s an exciting and essential element.

Detailed instructions, including a somewhat prescriptive methodology and a set of invocations, chart the territory for a series of dialogues, much like a set of rites might pave the way for unpredictable arisings. There’s an obvious analogy here with mapping uncharted terrain. Equipment, maps and road code are provided. The performers embark, interpreting directions according to their lights, taking the audience with them for the ride. Similarly, the ‘firestarters’ might be understood as channels or invocations towards dialogues with an ‘other’ dimension. Basic rules of language, vocabulary and syntax are established with the details of communication entrusted to the trio.

Phil Dadson is represented by Starkwhite, Auckland.

www.sonicsfromscratch.co.nz

Composer - de Castro-Robinson, Eve

At Water’s Birth (NZTrio commission, premiered April 2008) – 10′

Split the Lark (violin and piano) – 15′

Tumbling Strains (violin and cello) – 15′

At Water’s Birth:

The title and words used in the piece are lifted from the long poem Archipelago by Denys Trussell:

At water’s birth/the light deluge, /amen of stars/losing energy/earthwards

At the joining/of elements/the sea and/the eye of/the fish holding/the world/in its glance.

this liquid rhythm/ of space, this/blue turning/of the world/s water

archipelago

floating/in the light/s deluge/of the world/before its word.

I have found Trussell’s poetry particularly inspiring for music. this liquid drift of light for piano (2000) was also to do with water-related imagery. There is a concern with ecology, geology, mythology and identity in the poems, which acts for me as a springboard to musical utterances of a ritualistic type – hence the vocalisations, whistling, and other heightened sonorities which pervade the work. The meandering sections of the music suggest a relationship with the forces of water, its depth, currents and undercurrents. The rhythm of the words too, is reflected in those of the music.

At water’s birth was commissioned by NZTrio, with funding from Creative New Zealand.

 

Composer - Downes, David

Kingdom – for piano trio and film (NZTrio commission 2009) – 10′

Kingdom is an animated film/music piece exploring the strange rituals and hidden fantasies of a family meal. The work was commissioned by NZTrio.

Composer - Elmsly, John

Ritual Triptych (NZTrio Commission, premiered September 2014) – 17′

Postcards – 15′

Ritual Triptych:

It would be tempting to look for a religious connotation with such a title, but the allusion is simpler. This is simply a work whose full energy is in a central panel, which is, at times, an explosive landscape of patterns, repetition, overlaps, collisions: the complexities of life. The central panel is framed by more focused, evocative, meditative commentaries.

The composer writes: “There is no direct visual inspiration for the work, though I have long had a fascination with the various historical manifestations of the idea. Perhaps there are parallels in this obsessive central movement, with Garden of Earthly Delights by Hieronymus Bosch, one of the greatest masterpieces of the Northern Renaissance, or with the erotic danger and confusion in Francis Bacon’s Triptych 1970.”

John Elmsly has wide interests in all aspects of contemporary composition, substantial experience in electroacoustic music. He recently retired from his position as Head of Composition Studies in the School of Music at the University of Auckland, where he has taught since 1984. He also directed the Karlheinz Company contemporary music ensemble, which frequently broadcasts on Radio NZ Concert and often features music from the Asia-Pacific region. Elmsly’s compositions include works for symphony orchestra (a number recorded and/or performed by the Auckland Philharmonia and the New Zealand Symphony Orchestra), vocal and choral music, chamber and solo music commissioned by many leading performers, and electroacoustic music. His music has been performed and broadcast in many countries. Recent premieres include ‘Singing after the East Wind’ for alto flute and electronics by Abigail Sperling, and a new string quartet commissioned by the Jade Quartet.

Composer - Farr, Gareth

Triple Concerto (Commissioned by Turnovsky Trio and NZTrio 2006) – 25′

Ahi (1998) – 15’

Mondo Rondo (Arranged for NZTrio) – 12′

Forbidden Colours (2015) – 10′

 

Triple Concerto:

On the whole the piece is tonal, displaying noticeable signs of my love for Prokofiev and Shostakovich – especially their orchestral works. All three solo parts are extremely virtuosic: the piano part in particular uses many virtuoso techniques that are found in the Prokofiev piano concertos, and if you watch the pianist youwill see her flying about the keyboard at times. The second movement differs significantly in mood to the outer movements; it is less tonal and is, in fact, more romantic. It features the vibraphone in the percussion section, and has a somewhat eerie feel to it.

As he was writing the concerto, Farr says he came to understand why there are so few triple concertos in the repertoire. ‘With the piano taking the harmony, the violin the melody, and the cello taking a countermelody, there is very little left for the orchestra to do!’ He solved the problem in various ways: ‘I let the trio play as if it was chamber music, there are tutti passages where the trio plays in balance with the orchestra, and then orchestral passages where the trio drops out and the orchestra goes wild!’

Originally commissioned by the University of Waikato in celebration of the opening of the WEL Energy Trust Academy of Performing Arts, in its first incarnation the Triple Concerto was a single-movement work of ‘overture’ score and duration. It was composed for the Turnovsky Trio, who were to be Artists-in-Residence at the Academy. In 2005, Farr received a commission from the New Zealand Trio to expand the concerto into a full-length work.

For more information visit: Gareth’s website

 

Composer - Farr/Nunns, Gareth/Richard

Nga Kete e Toru for piano trio and taonga puoro (NZTrio commission – premiered January 2010) – 20′

Nga Kete e Toru was commissioned by NZTrio in 2009, and is a conversation between the instruments of Māori and Pākehā cultures. The original composition, for piano trio and taonga puoro player, features a group of traditional Māori instruments called the Pūmotomoto – instruments characterised by having only one finger hole resulting in a pitch range that is much more limited than other Māori wind instruments such as the Koauau and Pūtorino. The Pūmotomoto playing technique includes manipulation of embouchure (mouth position) to create edge tones, high harmonics, and bending of pitches.

The seven sections of Nga Kete e Toru are inspired by various aspects of the story of Tane and his ascent to the heavens to acquire the three baskets of knowledge – Nga Kete e Toru. The Pūmotomoto is mentioned many times in the story, and as such it becomes a key character in the narrative of this epic journey.

Prelude – Te Ao
The Pūmotomoto Tawhirirangi (Ostrich bone) is the soloist of the prelude, with the trio providing an atmospheric bed of string harmonics, resonant piano chords and textures. Just as the movement draws to a close, the Pakuru Whakatangi Tanguru (sticks) can be heard, signifying the insects that attack Tane on his ascent to the heavens, heralding the Battle of Whiro.

Movement 1 – The Battle with Whiro
The spotlight turns to the trio for this movement, with battle calls from the Pūtātara (conch shell) and Pūmotomoto Tutu alternating with their tumultuous sounds in sharp bursts and staccato figurations. The Tokere (stones) are heard before the Purerehua, which evokes the wild winds that blow the attacking insects away from Tane.

Interlude – The Fontanelles
Briefly departing from the story of Tane, this movement focuses on another aspect of the Pūmotomoto. Featuring the Pūmotomoto Ewe (with its carving of the image of the foetus) it highlights the traditional use of the Pūmotomoto for imparting knowledge to the unborn child through the belly of the mother, and up until the fontanelles close after birth. The music is a variation of the Prelude. This section also features the Hue Puruhau (Gourd).

Movement 2 – Nga Kete e Toru
The centrepiece of the work, this movement features the Pūmotomoto Toroa (albatross bone), the most melodically flexible of all the Pūmotomoto. Along with the Putorino (an instrument shaped and representing a Cocoon), both instruments play throughout the movement, weaving themselves in and out of the sinuous melodies of the violin, cello and piano.

Interlude 2 – Tane
Once again, we visit the music of the Prelude in another incarnation – this time with the Pūmotomoto Miro and Koauau Koura (crayfish claw) as soloists – evoking the incantation of the god’s blessing that allows Tane to approach the 12th heaven.

Movement 3 – The Guardhouse of the 12th Heaven
The finale signifies the heroic success of Tane reaching the 12th heaven. The Pūmotomoto Tawhirirangi and Putorino alternate with the trio, as in the first movement. The Koauau appears again, before the Pūmotomoto Tutu returns to finally be joined by the Pūmotomoto matai.

Postlude – Te Ao
The Pūmotomoto Tutu is played like a Pūtātara (conch shell) or Pukaea (wooden trumpet) into the resonating strings of the piano, and the Pahu Pounamu is struck.

Composer - Gao, Ping

Su Xie Si Ti/Four Sketches (NZTrio commission, premiered July 2009) – 10′

Feng Zheng/Kite, for piano trio and guzheng (NZTrio commission, premiered Sept 2016) – 19′

Su Xie Si Ti:

The work has 4 short movements each with a subtitle –

1. Xiao (Boisterous)

2. Cuo Diao (Split Melody)

3. Dui Wei (Counterpoint)

4. Shuo (Shining)

As the movements are short and concise, they possess one single mood, and often one single musical idea. They are like snapshots of moments in memory. In fact, some of them are indeed musical translations of scenes from my experience, for example, Counterpoint was inspired by seeing a village funeral procession in rural China. The family members of the deceased progressed slowly, interrupted by frequent kneeling down and crying (which can be both a formal part of the ritual and an expression from the heart), while a band of very odd mixture of Western and Chinese instruments (such as a trombone and a Suona, a Chinese double-reed instrument) led the way by playing very upbeat happy music. It is not surprising as funerals in China are referred to as “the White Happiness”, while weddings are the red counterparts. In my music, the two moods are in counterpoint creating a synthetic mood of the happy and sad. Cuo Diao, split melody, or wrong key, (Movement 2) is an isorhythmic love song in which notes in the tune are playfully replaced by ‘wrong notes’ which are not from the tune or its mode. These erroneous notes, however, later little by little form a transposition of the original tune in higher register.

Su Xie Si Ti was commissioned by the 2009 NZ Music Educator’s Conference for NZTrio, through funds provided by Creative New Zealand.

 

Feng Zheng (Kite):

  1. Still Clouds
  2. The Breeze
  3. Breaking the Air
  4. Broken Line

The Chinese invented the kite. Being made of paper and resembling the shape of a hawk, it was originally called “the paper hawk”. In ancient times, a bamboo tube was installed at the tail of the kite which made a Zheng-like sound when wind passed through it. Therefore, it is also called Feng Zheng (Wind Zheng) a term that is commonly used now.

Kites used to be flown often in the Qingming festival – a time when the Chinese pay respect to their deceased family members and ancestors. The kite is the carrier of their best wishes to the dead. The spiritual yearning in addition to the rigorous physical activeness gives kite-flying a feeling of tenderness that is also robust and healthy.

Gao Ping writes: ‘My “Wind Zheng” is dedicated to a dear friend who is no longer with us, Jack Body, the great New Zealand composer. I have entrusted my emotions for Jack to the wings and sounds of the kite. A motive made of Jack’s name (jACk BoDy)) appears in the beginning and the end of the piece. Is it possible that Jack would meet my free drifting kite somewhere?’

 

Gao Ping is a pianist-composer, born in Sichuan province, known for evocative textures and piano vocalization, and is the receipient of high musical honors. He studied in the USA in the 1990’s and is his work is commissioned and performed around the world. Many prestigious venues have presented his work such as the Aspen Music Festival, Dresdener Musikfestspiele, Hibiki Hall Festival (Japan), New Zealand International Arts Festival (Wellington), and the Beijing-Modern International Music Festival. Visit www.gaoping.org/biography for more details.

Composer - Gardner, James

Blessed Unrest (NZTrio commission 2006) – 7.5′

 

“There is a vitality, a life force, a quickening that is translated through you into action, and because there is only one of you in all time, this expression is unique… You have to keep open and aware directly to the urges that motivate you. Keep the channel open. No artist is pleased. There is no satisfaction whatever at any time. There is only a queer, divine dissatisfaction, a blessed unrest that keeps us marching and makes us more alive than the others.” (Martha Graham to Agnes DeMille)

The composer writes: “Blessed unrest was written in response to a commission from NZTrio requesting a short ‘attention-grabbing’ piece to open a concert; a ‘high-impact, dynamic and edgy’ work that would start ‘with all guns blazing’. It took a long time until I found something that I thought satisfied this demand, because I wanted to create a sense of pent-up energy and its release in bursts rather than write an obviously motoric pulse-basedpiece. While struggling to find a solution I came across the Martha Graham quote that gave the piece its title.”

Blessed unrest was commissioned by NZTrio, with funds provided by Creative New Zealand. It was composed in 2006.

Composer - Gendall, Chris

Intaglio – 10′

Triple Concerto – Premiere August 2012

Dulcet Tones (written for NZTrio in 2016) – 9′

Composer - Greenbaum, Stuart

The year without a summer (Trans-Tasman composer exchange commission, written for NZTrio – premiered April 2010) – 15′ 

800 Million Heartbeats – 8′

Book of Departures – 10′

The year without a summer:

The eruption in 1815 of Mt. Tambora on the Indonesian island of Sumbawa was over four times as big as the eruption of Krakatoa later that century but perhaps not as well known. The ash and dust thrown up into the earth’s upper atmosphere further resulted in ‘the year without a summer’ in 1816. This was by all accounts a devastating ecological event that caused unseasonal cold temperatures and widespread famine.

The first movement of this trio is short and fast. It imagines a dark cloud of dust approaching from the distance, not knowing where it came from. Did it seem a premonition? How long did they think it would last? The longer second movement shifts forward to 1816 and contemplates the upheaval of people’s lives – of having their world turned upside down in one way or another and having to regroup and adjust to new circumstances.

 

Composer - Guo, Ming

Spring at Westlake

Composer - Hamilton, David

The Faraday Cage (NZTrio commission, premiered September 2015) – 13′

1. Inside the Cage
2. Outside the Cage
3. Inside Out and Outside In

David Hamilton is best known as a choral composer, although he has written a considerable quantity and variety of chamber music also and was delighted to be commissioned for this, his first piano trio, having known Ashley when he was a school student and been a long-time fan of the trio. ‘The Faraday Cage’ struck him as a great name for a piece, and although he professes no aptitude for science, he was initially interested in mathematics as well as music – “I studied first-year maths at university, and that knocked any further enthusiasm for maths out of me! From that point on it was clear what my path was going to be.” He writes:  

An electric field is a force field surrounding a charged particle, such as an electron or proton. A “faraday cage” is designed to block external static electric fields. Usually the “faraday cage” is an enclosure formed by conductive material or by a mesh of such material. Often they are literally cage-like. They may be as simple as a chain-link fence or even an ice bucket, whereas others will be formed from fine metallic mesh. Regardless of appearance, they take electrostatic charges, and distribute them around the exterior of the cage, channeling electricity along and around, but not through, the mesh, providing constant voltage on all sides of the enclosure.

Faraday cages are named after the English scientist Michael Faraday (1791-1867), who invented them in 1836.

The title was the starting point for the work, and suggested sparks and electric currents running around the surface of some object. Beyond that the music is not intended to literally conjure up a “faraday cage” although there is a small musical hint of one. The opening sounds from the piano are the extreme notes of the instrument (lowest A and highest C) – suggesting that this is the inside limit of the cage through which nothing is penetrating. But there’s also incredibly energy on the inside which is trying to escape beyond the cage.

In the second movement (“Outside the Cage”) the same two notes in the mid-range (A below middle C and the C an octave above) represent the cage, and in this section the music never ventures inside these pitch boundaries – except at the very end of the movement where the cello’s open A string is used in the final chords. The final movement, “Inside Out and Outside In”, is an energetic free-for-all and suggests the energy of the electric field being diverted around the cage, twisting and turning this way and that. Alert listeners will spot significant use of the notes C-A-G-E in the opening bars of this section of the work! 

Written for, and dedicated to, NZTrio with funding from Creative New Zealand.

Composer - Harris, Ross

Senryu (NZTrio Commission 2006) – 4′

There may be light – for piano trio and clarinet (Commissioned by CMNZ for clarinetist Julian Bliss and NZTrio 2015)

Senryu – a Japanese poetic form similar to haiku. “An inquiry into the nature of man.” Associating a poetic form with this music concerns the regular balanced proportions of section lengths. This strict formal outline is articulated freely and intuitively.

Senryu was commissioned by NZTrio, with funding from Creative New Zealand.

Composer - Him, Sophy

The First Strike (written for NZTrio and Cambodian ensemble Tray So – premiered March 2011) – 10′

HIM Sophy is the most important composer living and working in Cambodia today.  He is a professor at the Royal University of Fine Arts and the Royal Academy of Cambodia.  Born into a musical family in Prey Veng province, he began his musical studies in 1972.  During the Pol Pot regime he was forced to work in a labour camp.  In 1985 he received a scholarship to study in Moscow, where he lived for the next decade, earning doctorates in composition and musicology.  His opera, Where Elephants Weep, which integrates Cambodian instruments with a western rock band, was a sensational success when it was produced in Cambodia in 2008.

Composer - Holmes, Leonie

…when expectation ends (NZTrio commission, premiered October 2014) – 10′

‘Peace begins when expectations end’ – Sri Chimnoy

This well-known quote brings up a number of questions. For example, must ‘peace’ mean ‘quiet’? Can ‘inner peace’ somehow co-exist along with changing everyday states such as anxiety, doubt, excitement, or relaxation? Is it possible to be engaged in energetic, noisy or strenuous activity, yet be in a state of inner peace? How does one become free of expectations whilst still striving for a result?

This piece is a free-form exploration of these questions as repeating musical material resolves in a number of different ways.

Leonie Holmes is a lecturer in Composition and Music Studies at the School of Music, University of Auckland. She has written works for orchestra, chamber, choral, vocal and solo instruments, and receives frequent commissions from both professional and community groups. Among her orchestral music are Aquae Sulis, Frond, Ancient Rhythms, For Young Nick and Solstice, which have all been recorded by the NZSO. Her works for smaller groups include is there anybody in there for bassoonist, Ben Hoadley, and the New Zealand Music for Woodwind concert series, and through coiled stillness… for the University of Auckland Chamber Choir tour to England in 2011.

Leonie has been Composer-in-Residence at the Nelson School of Music, with the Auckland Philharmonia and the Manukau Symphony Orchestra, and was Composer-in-Schools. Her awards include the CANZ Trust Fund for Compositional Development, a Certificate for Contribution to Music in the Auckland Region from the NZSO and Symphony Friends, and the Philip Neill Memorial Prize in Composition. She is a committee member of the Composers Association of New Zealand (CANZ).

Composer - Kelly, Victoria

Toi Huarewa/The Suspended Way for piano trio and taonga puoro (2013) – Composed in collaboration with Horomona Horo, NZTrio and Tim Worrall – 20′

Sono for violin, cello and piano (2000) – 12’

TOI HUAREWA / THE SUSPENDED WAY – 

A way to reach the highest level of heaven – sometimes described as a web that hangs down from the heavens, sometimes described as a whirlwind path.

Victoria writes: When I began writing this piece, I wanted to create a musical world where Maori and Western musical traditions could communicate in the same language.

The Taonga Puoro form part of an aural tradition that is deeply entwined with Maori culture and absolutely unique to the Maori people. Western music, on the other hand, has evolved into a written tradition that encompasses the collision, intersection and evolution of many cultures. In this way, the two traditions couldn’t be more different.

To unite these two distinct voices, I decided to create a myth to act as a musical form. Maori mythology is fundamental to the Taonga Puoro and many other mythologies exist at the ancient heart of Western art – so this felt like a natural starting point.

Every instrument of the Taonga Puoro has a spiritual guardian (Kaitiaki) and a complex ancestral lineage (Whakapapa). The Kaitiaki are the Atua (Gods) of the materials from which the instruments are made. The Whakapapa of the instruments are made up of: the Atua and their descendants, the performers and their ancestors, the instrument makers and their ancestors, the places where the materials for the instruments originated, the materials themselves, the elements through which they’ve passed in all their various forms. Their tikanga is a beautiful interweaving of spirituality and science.

As I’ve explored this idea, I’ve come to imagine whakapapa as a virtually infinite series of pathways that lead everyone and everything back to the place where we all began – and the Taonga Puoro as voices that can communicate along these pathways, transcending time and space to connect us to our origins.

The concepts of guardianship and ancestry also apply to the instruments of the Piano Trio, who can find their own Kaitiaki amongst the Atua of the materials from which theyʼre made – whether those guardians and ancestors are from Aotearoa, or the many other places from which Western culture is derived. They too give voices to their ancestors and connect us to our origins and each other.

As this piece has evolved and I’ve collaborated with Horomona, Tim and the Trio – who have all been so generous with their knowledge – other themes have revealed themselves and become fundamental to the music. The most important of these are concepts of transformation, transition and illumination.

In Te Ao Maori, there is a state that exists between life and death, earth and sky, light and dark. It’s the point where the spiritual and physical worlds intersect. I’ve drawn my own, personal comparisons between this idea and some of the beautiful theories, about parallel universes and multiple dimensions, that occupy the minds of physicists.

These kinds of spaces are where I imagine the mythological Toi Huarewa to manifest, places full of mystery and wonder that all of us, regardless of our culture, seek to access or understand in our own ways.

Click here to read about the collaborative process on Victoria’s Blog.

Click here to watch a short documentary about Toi Huarewa.

Composer - Ker, Dorothy

String Taxonomy, for piano trio and guzheng – 13′

Of String Taxonomy, Dorothy writes: ‘A sonic alchemy amongst the four instruments emerges through shared gestures, so that bowing, plucking, striking and bending are no longer what distinguishes them. Research for the piece has taken place in collaboration with Dr Shu Jiang, a guzheng player based at Sheffield University.’

Composer - Lardelli, Dylan

Between Strings, for piano trio and guzheng (NZTrio Commission 2013) – 10′

Shells, for piano trio and guzheng (2016) – 5′

Dylan Lardelli was born in Wellington and holds a Bachelor’s degree in Guitar Performance and a Master’s degree in Composition from Victoria University of Wellington. He has studied with Stefano Bellon in Venice and, from 2009-2010, held a DAAD stipend to work with Dieter Mack at the Lübeck Musikhochschule in Germany.

Dylan has been the recipient of many scholarships and awards and won first place with his piece, Four Fragments, in the Asian Composers League Young Composers’ Competition in Tokyo in 2003. Among the musicians to commission and perform his works are Yuji Takahashi, Mark Menzies, Lucas Vis, the Cygnus Ensemble, the New Zealand Symphony Orchestra, and members of Ensemble Modern and Musik Fabrik respectively. As a guitarist, Lardelli has performed with the New Zealand Symphony Orchestra, Stroma, 175 East, and also in Korea, Thailand, and Germany. He has recorded numerous New Zealand compositions.

 

Between Strings presents a musical world of shifting intimacy and distance. The intrinsic differences and similarities between each voice of the ensemble is explored and placed in simultaneous proximity.

The piece wavers between disparate states of harmonicity, activity and resonance of strings; and a casting of shared physicality, precise energy, and common harmonic language. The work occupies harmonic spaces between traditional tuning, provided by the inherent flexibility possessed by each of the string instruments.

Often verging on liminal edges of noise and silence, Between Strings displays the combined efforts of intimate chamber music-making, and music-making with musicians from differing traditions.

Between Strings was commissioned by NZTrio with funding from Creative New Zealand.

Lardelli Note by Joy Aberdein © 2013

 

Of Shells, Dylan writes: ‘Shells presents a performance world where the gestures and actions of the musicians have largely been emptied of sound content. This produces an intentional distant sound world, where the semblance of musical shapes wash between stronger block-like interruptions.’

Composer - Li, Jun

The Steps of Life

Composer - Li, Pan

The Flame

Composer - Margetić, Karlo

Lightbox (NZTrio Commission) Premiere July 2012 – 14’

Karlo Margetić holds degrees in composition and clarinet from the New Zealand School of Music. He is currently Emerging Composer in Residence with the Vector Wellington Orchestra, and was Composer in residence with the NZSO National Youth Orchestra in 2007 and Young Composer in Residence with the APO in 2007 and 2008.

Margetić has been the recipient of numerous prizes in composition, and has received commissions and performances from NZTrio, Duo Solaris, Saxcess, the APO, and the NZSO National Youth Orchestra. His music has been workshopped by the NZSO as part of the CreativeNZ/SOUNZ Readings in 2009 and 2011.

Margetić is also an active performer and is Co-Director of the SMP Ensemble, with which he has appeared as composer, clarinettist, conductor and narrator.

The composer writes: “When I think of a piano trio, I immediately think of a transparent interplay of lines. This has something to do with the fact that the instruments that make up the modern piano trio are not particularly homogeneous, unlike say, a string quartet. It’s as if somebody had strewn some line drawings of simple three dimensional objects on a photographer’s lightbox, all on top of one another, resulting in an unexpected and strangely beautiful assemblage.”

Lightbox was commissioned by NZTrio, with funding from Creative NZ.

Composer - Norris, Michael

dirty pixels (NZTrio Commission, premiered 2004) – 12’

dirty pixels was written in response to two stimuli: an exhibition of the same name curated by Stella Brennan in the Adam Art Gallery featuring New Zealand artwork of a certain rough-hewn, gritty nature; and hearing the work Jagden und Formen by German composer Wolfgang Rihm, an unremittingly wild and preposterous discourse of extremes.

These two stimuli caused something of an aesthetic dilemma: leaving behind my rather French fondness for euphonious washes of sound, I became interested in the characteristics of roughness and raggedness, and in how a ‘pure’ conceptual scheme, such as the quite systematic construction I had formulated just prior to starting this piece, became ‘dirtied’ by intuition, by the exigencies of the material and by the reality of having it performed.

dirty pixels was commissioned by NZTrio, with funding from Creative New Zealand.

Composer - Palmer, Juliet

Vermillion Songs (written for NZTrio and Simon O’Neill, tenor)

Juliet writes: The American Emily Dickinson (1830-1886) is regarded as one of the foremost poets of all time. Although her modern sensibility meant that little of her work was published during her lifetime, her poetry is now arguably the most frequently set by contemporary composers. Vital, vivid and pithy, Dickinson’s work is both immediately appealing and rewarding upon repeated listening. Running through Dickinson’s work is a concern with the workings of the body itself. Her poems offer a compelling inner perspective on the breath, the circulation of the blood, varieties of pain, and the last moments of life itself. While human-scaled and engaged with the viscerality of the everyday, her work simultaneously conjures the epic and the immense — cosmic rhythms and the ineffability of consciousness. This new work brings together six of Dickinson’s poems in sequence: from an acknowledgement of the insights of science, through contemplation of pain, disorientation, a return to consciousness, acceptance of the fragility of existence, to a final song of death. In composing Vermillion Songs, I draw upon research at Toronto’s Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre by medical biophysicist Dr. Peter Burns. The soundscapes of the inner body, captured by ultrasound, are both precise and evocative: from the constrained intensity of vessels leading to the brain, to the cavernous resonance as blood washes back into the heart from the liver. In bringing together the operatic voice, Dickinson’s evocative lyrics, the sonic possibilities of piano trio and the high-tech soundscapes documented by bioacoustics, I hope to offer listeners a fresh glimpse into the poetry of the human body.

(commissioned by NZTrio with funds from Creative New Zealand)

Composer - Psathas, John

Helix (2007) – 23′ (NZTrio Commission)

Island Songs (1995, arranged 1998) – 13’

Piano Quintet – 20′

Corybas – 12′

Aegean – 4′

 

Helix:

Archon: metron

The biggest nothing of them all

Tarantismo

Helix, for piano trio, was commissioned by NZTrio with funding from The University of Auckland. It was composed in 2006.

Composer - Rimmer, John

Burning the Calories (2006) – 6’45”

When NZTrio asked for a short ‘high impact, dynamic, edgy’ kind of piece, I immediately thought of one in which the physical gestures of the performers would be exploited. The performers would burn more calories than is usual.

In the gym that I attend, the participants begin with warm-up exercises followed by the more vigorous activities of rowing, cycling and walking. I decided to use these activities to shape my piece. Thus the form of ‘Burning the Calories’ has 5 sections; a ‘warm-up’ followed by 3 ‘burn’ sections where the violin, piano and cello take turns to be prominent and a ‘warm-down’.

Burning the Calories was commissioned by NZTrio with funding from Creative New Zealand and was completed on 28 February 2006.

Composer - Shen, Nalin

Meng Yuan 朦塬 for piano trio and guzheng (2014)

Meng Yuan 朦塬 for piano trio (2016)

Meng Yuan was commissioned by Jack Body in 2012. The original work was composed for zheng, violin, cello & piano in 2014 and premiered on 17 December 2015 in a special concert “Body Music 2015 – Jack Body Cross-Cultural Music Conference” at the Zhejiang Conservatory of Music, China. The second version for piano trio alone was composed in January 2016 and is dedicated to NZTrio.

“The title of the piece, ‘Meng Yuan’, suggests a faraway place, near the end of the earth, in my memory, a place of legend. When I listen to Zandanhuen (乌仁娜) ‘Yanzaganzootoisaaralmori’, I felt that this is where the story comes from.”

Composer - Speak, Jeroen

Serendipity Fields, for piano trio and guzheng – 11′

Jeroen writes: ‘This work is, at its heart a reworking of several earlier works, though recomposed for this new ensemble. The guzheng (and its ancient predecessor gu qin) have interested me ever since my first visits to China, and many works from this period use ideas generated from the instrument, most notably the traditional notation system (wen zi pu) which was used as early as the 10th century. The title alludes to the many overlaps between the guzheng and the first works I composed, particularly on the gestural level, which enable these instruments to work together seamlessly.’

Composer - Taylor, Alex

burlesques mécaniques (NZTrio Commission – premiere October 2012) – 10′

Alex Taylor is one of New Zealand’s leading young composers of orchestral and chamber music. His music has been performed by prominent artists, including the New Zealand Symphony Orchestra, the Auckland Philharmonia Orchestra, 175 East and NZTrio. He completed his Masters in Composition under the supervision of Dr Eve de Castro-Robinson and Associate Professor John Elmsly at Auckland University in 2011. Alex’s works have been featured in concerts in New Zealand, Australia, Indonesia, China, America and Europe.

In 2012 Alex was the youngest recipient to date of the SOUNZ Contemporary Award for his work [inner] for viola and orchestra, for which he was also awarded the NZSO-Todd Young Composer Award, as well as the Orchestra’s Choice Award. He has won numerous prizes and scholarships through Auckland University, including winning the 2009 Lilburn Trust Competition. 2012 saw Alex complete a residency with the NZSO-National Youth Orchestra, and commissions for the NZTrio, 175 East and The Committee.

As well as being a composer, Alex curates the Intrepid Music Project, a series of contemporary arts events focusing on new music and poetry. He plays a variety of instruments, including violin, saxophone and piano, sings, conducts, and writes on musical and non-musical topics. He has performed in a variety of groups including Auckland Youth Orchestra, DSCH String Quartet, the Blackbird Ensemble and Dr Colossus. Alex is a regular contributor to the LOUNGE poetry readings and his poems have been published in Potroast, minarets and JAAM.

The composer writes: “ burlesques mécaniques is a collection of grotesque miniatures whose characters are not people or animals but dances. These dances have been mechanised, electrified, and often obscured by their own rhythmic impulse. Old forms are given new identities, freed from the confines of metric stability and the expectation that they be “danceable”. The essentially mechanical, artificial aspect of music (and of art in general?) is embodied in the piano, here a brittle, seedy protagonist whose string limbs hover and flail about it. Conflicting rhythms dominate the surface, oscillating between insistent repetition and mad, angular flourishes. The generally jerky, muscular rhythmic material is periodically frozen throughout the work, most strikingly in the ninth movement (chain). Here a string of rich, impressionistic chords briefly reveals an alternative, interior world which is then rudely dismissed in an almost haphazard finale.”

Composer - Tian, Gang

Circle Dances

Composer - Ung, Chinary

In Memorium, for amplified piano trio and voices (written for NZTrio – premiered March 2011) – 10′

Chinary Ung was born in Takéo, Cambodia and went on to study in the USA in 1964.  Becoming a US citizen, Ung was the first American composer to win the highly coveted and international Grawemeyer Award in 1989.  Among other honours, Ung has received awards from The Kennedy Centre (Fiedheim Award), The American Academy of Arts and Letters, Asia Foundation, Ford Foundation, Guggenheim Foundation, Joyce Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Arts.  He has received many commissions including those from the Philadelphia Orchestra, Meet the Composer, Koussevitzky Foundation, Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra, and the La Jolia Summerfest and Santa Fe Summer Music Festivals.  He is currently a professor of composition at the University of California, San Diego.

Composer - Whitehead, Gillian

The river flows on… (written for NZTrio and Cambodian ensemble Tray So – premiered March 2011) – 20′

Piano Trio (Sept 2004 – NZTrio commission) – 20′

About the Piano Trio:

“The ideas behind the piece have to do with changing perspectives of patterns in water – in the bubbling of streams, the tumble of a waterfall, in the spiralling eddies where stream meets lake at sunrise. In the opening movement, a group of short themes and ideas initially form a mosaic-like section, which recurs in developed and varied forms around more reflective passages. The second movement reverses the first, in the sense that slow, sustained sections are interrupted by more energetic material, and the final movement draws all the previous ideas together.”

Gillian Whitehead’s Piano Trio was commissioned by NZTrio, with funding from Creative New Zealand.

Composer - Young, Ken

Piano Trio (premiered October 2015) – 17′

2015 is a busy year for Kenneth Young. He’s been composer in residence at the Auckland Philharmonia for the past couple of years, and he also has a CD of his orchestral music coming out with the NZSO, to celebrate a significant birthday in November – listen out for him as Composer of the Week on Radio NZ Concert. There’s also his teaching at the NZSM, his production work for Rattle, and his conducting – he works regularly with all the major orchestras in New Zealand and Australia – and he is probably best known for his orchestral music, having been Principal Tuba of the NZSO for some 25 years. However, he has also written a quantity of solo instrumental and chamber music, and describes it as ‘the acid test’ for a composer. ‘You’ve got to be very much on your game, because there’s nowhere to hide. It’s very good for honing the old technique.’  

This is his first piano trio:  

‘There’s no programme as such, but it’s not abstract, put it that way. When I began writing it I was feeling angry about a couple of things that were going on – political and societal issues here in New Zealand. My ire was raised, and when my ire is raised I always find it a good time to pick up a pen and take it out on a piece of manuscript paper – rather than anybody else! It’s quite a cathartic process for me – I’ve experienced that previously. So that’s why the trio starts angrily, and the first section continues on all fast and furious until it reaches the expressive part of the piece, when the tension dissipates somewhat and it becomes more melancholy. There’s a sad little waltz in the piano and a lament from Ashley, then an uplifting solo from Justine towards the end. I don’t want to say how it ends – that would spoil the surprise! But let’s just say, there are several mood swings in there. What I can say is I’ve loved writing it. They’re all friends of mine and it’s just a joy to be able to write for people who can play anything I put in front of them. They all get a chance to express themselves with slower-form music, but they also get a chance to engage us with their phenomenal technique.’

Composer - Yudane, Wayan

Entering the Stream (NZTrio commission – premiered 2 April 2009) – 10′

Entering the stream
as if a point of no return has been reached
as light illuminating a moment of darkness
or sound log passed into silence
no trace remains, no desire or need
the stream holds life in its sway
constant flow, forever in a state of
flux, of uncertainty, our thoughts
and senses grasp the music
our craving devours beauty
yet the moment of realisation is when time recedes
as fast as we think
we have possessed it.
So, enter the stream
for you will never
be the same again
you were never
the same
ever.

Grateful thanks to NZTrio for commissioning this work, to Creative NZ for the funding to make that possible, and to Jack Body for being part of the process.

Composer - Zhang, Xin

Blooming Ripple

Composer - Zhang, Yin

White Stones

Composer - Zhang, Zeyi

Blooming

Composer - Zhu, Uni

Walking on Lotus in Rainy Night

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NZTrioSaturday, June 24th, 2017 at 1:24pm
Happy Birthday William Dart and here's to many more! You are so appreciated - from us all at NZTrio
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NZTrioFriday, June 23rd, 2017 at 8:03am
RITUAL TRIPTYCH from our 2014 Loft Series at Q will be aired tonight at 7pm on #MusicAlive RNZ Concert : #Beethoven #JohnElmsly #Sciarrino #Mendelssohn
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NZTrioThursday, June 22nd, 2017 at 9:44am
Up next: day one of reading through our Composing Competition score submissions. Can't wait to see/hear what treasures are in store... the literary inspirations alone make for great reading!
NZTrio
NZTrioWednesday, June 14th, 2017 at 12:25pm
We promised to share more from our FLARE 2016 live performance Resound videos funded by #NZOnAir and #SOUNZ Centre for New Zealand Music. This is #KennethYoung's arrangement of Mahler: Lieder eines fahrenden Gesellen. Enjoy!
NZTrio
MAHLER: Lieder eines fahrenden Gesellen, arr. KENNETH YOUNG
This is "MAHLER: Lieder eines fahrenden Gesellen, arr. KENNETH YOUNG" by SOUNZ on Vimeo, the home for high quality videos and the people who love them.
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NZTrio
NZTrioSaturday, June 10th, 2017 at 8:00am
Catch us on RNZ Concert today at 3pm for a replay of 2015's BLAST concert at QTheatre.
(FAURÉ: Piano Trio in D minor Op 120; K YOUNG: Piano Trio; BEETHOVEN arr Beethoven: Symphony No 2 in D Op 36)(recorded in Q Loft Theatre, Auckland by RNZ)
NZTrio
NZTrioSunday, May 28th, 2017 at 9:00am
A big shout out to NZ On Air and SOUNZ Centre for New Zealand Music for funding these Resound films of our 2016 FLARE adventure with Simon O'Neill. Performed live at the Great Hall of the Arts Centre of CHCH, this is Alex Taylor's transcription of Strauss's 'Four Lieder' Op.27. More to come.... https://vimeo.com/209649644
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R. STRAUSS: Four Lieder, arr. ALEX TAYLOR
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